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Next up were the transformers, or at least the rooms (more like closets) in which they once stood. The doors were locked, but one can climb through an opening underneath them and thus climb in. No reason to do that though, as there is not much to see and no way into the factory. Even a hole probably to small for me to crawl through had been walled off. I only explored two of the 5 (I think), I guessed the rest would be more of the same.
Next was a small staircase up with a small room (1 square meter or something like that) and a small staircase down leading to a small, dark and dirty cellar.
I didn't dare to go any further, afraid of getting noticed through the chainlinked fence by those kids. I noticed some metal supports on the wall somewhere around here, it might be possible to climb onto the roof and by this way get into the factory.
Getting a bit more daring and agitated by my failure to really enter the factory I went back and now climbed up the loading platform and went through the sliding door. The roof of this room has completely collapsed.


Collapsed roof, nature slowly taking over.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


Picture of the chimney/watertower and the silo taken from the room with the collapsed roof.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


Someone had gone through the trouble of making a neat crawling path around and underthrough the collapsed roof. Maybe kids, maybe some outcast of modern society. In any case, it lead to another room, this one completely intact. The roof was leaking in some places, but for the remainder even quite clean. The riveted steel roofbeams looked sturdy, but some had a large bend in it, like there was a huge load on the roof. I'm still surprised about it. The roof wasn't big enough for a pool of water of such a scale. I'm guessing metallurgy of over a century ago wasn't what it is today and the beams are not as strong as they look. The room was a dead end, the only other door bricked up (and leading outside).


Intact room. Notice the bend in the rear roofbeams.


Walled off doorway, leading outside.

I climbed the wall again and walked around the factory. On the western side (next to the stream) a part was obviously demolished and completely removed. I'm guessing it was destroyed by fire and the damage was so large it could not be locked/walled off. All doorways to this part have been walled off. A heap of dirt gave me a look over a part of the roof which was in bad shape, as in not only leaking, but with many large holes in it.


West-side of the factory. You can also see a bit of the front (south) side of the factory, which is still in reasonable shape.


Same part of the factory, now in northern direction

The south side of the factory is in good shape, with most windows intact. It is in use by a dealer in damaged cars.


South side of the factory, with windows still intact.

Not much has been done with the factory in the past years, so I'm guessing it will be around for some time. I plan to go there again this summer on a rainy day, when there's more cover from trees and bushes.
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